In family child care,
your child is always at home.

Real homes. Real caring. Real Learning.

Why Choose FCC

Significant research shows that warm, loving, and home-like settings are natural environments for children during the early years. Family child care is the choice of many families because it provides safety and the comfort of home while offering a consistent caregiver/educator throughout the years.

NAFCC is the ONLY national organization that offers accreditation solely for family child care programs. NAFCC Accreditation is an indicator that a family child care program offers safe, inviting spaces and warm, nurturing care complete with educational activities designed to meet the needs and interests of all children while promoting individual development.

Nationally accredited homes meet higher standards in child care and set the benchmark for quality.

family
people holding hands
home graphic

Tips

From childcare.gov

  • When visiting a family child care provider, ask to see a copy of the program’s license, registration or certification, and inspection history.
  • Most states post inspection reports online. Use the See Your State’s Resources feature on this website to see inspection reports of child care providers you are considering. These reports provide valuable information about the quality of child care programs. Check them before you select a program and regularly while your child is enrolled.
  • Confirm that every adult living, working, or volunteering in the family child care home has had a comprehensive background check.
  • Family child care providers may or may not hire additional staff to work in the child care home. Ask your provider about the number of adults present while your child is there, and make sure that each staff person has received training on important health and safety topics such as first aid and CPR, safe sleep, giving children medication, and child development. Learn more about the 12 health and safety trainings that all adults caring for children should have.
  • Ask about information and activities provided for parents. Ask if the program provides opportunities for parents to learn about how their children are doing or talk about their children’s progress.
  • Many family child care providers offer rich learning environments. Ask your provider to explain the types of activities they have planned and how those activities support your child’s learning.
  • Make sure that the provider’s policies and opinions on discipline, supervision, safe sleep, nutrition, child development, and learning align with what you want for your child.
  • Get a copy of the provider’s policies and contract. These documents should cover important topics, including hours of operation, rates, fees, field trip permission slips, transportation agreements, and absence policies. Read more about recommended items that should be included in a child care contract.
  • Print a list of questions and things to look for that you can take with you when visiting a potential child care program.

Join

You can become a child advocate! Quality childcare starts first with your choice in child care. When families choose quality, they raise expectations in the field. Policymakers and legislators listen to you to improve childcare options, raise minimum standards and fund childcare initiatives.

Stay Informed

Stay informed about your child’s growth and development, how to support your childcare provider, calls to action and more.

Tell Us Your Story

    Find an Accredited Program

    Parents, before you decide, ask “Are you NAFCC Accredited?”

    Tips

    Tips

    From childcare.gov

    • When visiting a family child care provider, ask to see a copy of the program’s license, registration or certification, and inspection history.
    • Most states post inspection reports online. Use the See Your State’s Resources feature on this website to see inspection reports of child care providers you are considering. These reports provide valuable information about the quality of child care programs. Check them before you select a program and regularly while your child is enrolled.
    • Confirm that every adult living, working, or volunteering in the family child care home has had a comprehensive background check.
    • Family child care providers may or may not hire additional staff to work in the child care home. Ask your provider about the number of adults present while your child is there, and make sure that each staff person has received training on important health and safety topics such as first aid and CPR, safe sleep, giving children medication, and child development. Learn more about the 12 health and safety trainings that all adults caring for children should have.
    • Ask about information and activities provided for parents. Ask if the program provides opportunities for parents to learn about how their children are doing or talk about their children’s progress.
    • Many family child care providers offer rich learning environments. Ask your provider to explain the types of activities they have planned and how those activities support your child’s learning.
    • Make sure that the provider’s policies and opinions on discipline, supervision, safe sleep, nutrition, child development, and learning align with what you want for your child.
    • Get a copy of the provider’s policies and contract. These documents should cover important topics, including hours of operation, rates, fees, field trip permission slips, transportation agreements, and absence policies. Read more about recommended items that should be included in a child care contract.
    • Print a list of questions and things to look for that you can take with you when visiting a potential child care program.
    Join

    Join

    You can become a child advocate! Quality childcare starts first with your choice in child care. When families choose quality, they raise expectations in the field. Policymakers and legislators listen to you to improve childcare options, raise minimum standards and fund childcare initiatives.

    Stay Informed

    Stay informed about your child’s growth and development, how to support your childcare provider, calls to action and more.

    Tell Us Your Story

      Find an accredited program

      Find an Accredited Program

      Parents, before you decide, ask “Are you NAFCC Accredited?”